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#Review Adazing is an Amazing Book Marketing Tool for Indie Authors

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If you're an Indie author you probably can't get away from the fact that marketing plays a huge role in the success of any book. Even if you have written the most awesome books since JK Rowling's Harry Potter series!

Before you work yourself up into a tizzy imagining doomsday scenarios of the thousands of bucks you're likely to spend to promote your book in order to give it a modicum of visibility in a hugely cluttered digital marketplace, here's some good news. There are enough tools out there to create stunning images for advertising your books. And these are known as Cover Mock-Ups.

A cover mock-up is basically a digital presentation of your book cover. Don't you love those pretty Instagram like images? And don't you wish you could create great looking advertising quality images for your books? With Adazing.com's mock-up generator, you can create these for your books in a jiffy.

There are plenty of options to choose from and the website also offers a couple of free templates. Best part is the ease of use. All you do is choose the template, upload your book cover and voila...you have a nifty little mock-up that you can share all over social media.
Take a look at these lovely mock-ups  that I created with the Adazing mock-up generator for my books. Unless you're a graphic designer and have some heavy duty photography skills to boot, creating these images would cost you a neat pile of bucks.

So, what are you waiting for? Check it out today and do come back and let me know what you think of this book marketing tool.

Click here to find out more about Adazing.com

Comments

  1. This is destiny .I was looking for something like this.Trying out now!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You'll love them! Thanks for reading. :)

      Delete
  2. Adazing is awesome. Good to know that you think so too!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Isn't it? It does make marketing seem easy peasy!:)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Replies
    1. Glad you think so. Thanks for reading. :)

      Delete
  5. This is fantastic, thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for reading, Ruchi. :)

      Delete

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